ISC-PIF’s Politoscope selected for the new “Places and Spaces : Mapping Science” Exhibition.

Drawing from across cultures and across scholarly disciplines, Places & Spaces: Mapping Science demonstrates the power of maps to address vital questions about the contours and content of human knowledge. An interdisciplinary and international advisory board chose each one of the works in the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit as an outstanding example of how visualization can bring patterns in scientific data into focus.

We are very proud to announce that the interactive visualisations of the Politoscope developed at ISC-PIF  has been included to the latest iteration of the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibition.

Designed for the 2017 French presidential election, Politoscope has since been on display in the Terra Data exhibit at the Cité des Sciences, the biggest science museum in Europe. Politoscope provided a way for the public to take the pulse of online communities during the last month of the 2017 French presidential election, and provided access to the candidates’ positions on major political issues over several months.

Politoscope uses millions of political and media tweets to visualize socio-semantic trends using a new methodology to reconstruct the socio-semantic dynamics of political activist Twitter networks. The macroscope makers are convinced of the need to make this kind of analysis of social media available to regular citizens as well as political elites.

How do you feel about the connection between social networks and electoral processes worldwide? Has real-time analysis of social media ever influenced your political opinion? Should it?

Politoscope and its companion website can be found at https://presidential2017.politoscope.org/.

Iteration 15 : Data Visualizations that Track the Flow of Resources

Thousands are flocking to Vancouver this week for IEEE’s VIS 2019 conference. The latest iteration of the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit will be ready. The Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center (CNS),  a research center at Indiana University’s School of Informatics, Computing & Engineering, is delighted to announce that the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibition will be on display as a part of the IEEE VIS Arts Program (VISAP) on October 20th in the Vancouver Convention Center. IEEE VIS 2019 is the premier forum for advances in theory, methods, and applications of visualization and visual analytics.

Dr. Katy Börner, VIS 2019 Keynote speaker, Victor H. Yngve Distinguished Professor of Engineering and Information Science at Indiana University, and curator of the Places & Spaces exhibit, will be unveiling the newest iteration of the exhibit, which focuses on the flow of resources.

Macroscopes help people see patterns, trends and outliers and past and present data. The macrocopes in this iteration aim to empower many to make informed decisions about desirable career, income disparity, migration, and social media diffusion trajectories.” –Katy Bӧrner

The flow of financial and human resources shapes the world, and understanding that flow can help you find your place in it. Your location, your income, your career skills, and the politics that have the ability to change the flow of all these resources affect where and how you live.

The new interactive visualizations:

Congratulations to the new exhibition selections, chosen by an international advisory board of leading data visualization experts.

  • Refugee Flow (Abin Abraham and Will (Jiahao) Su): People are continually on the move around the globe, seeking an escape from poverty, natural disaster, or violence. Launch an exploratory investigation of the migration crisis in Europe.
  • Politoscope (David Chavalarias and Maziyar Panahi): Political campaign managers use big data from social media networks to analyze public opinion and strategize accordingly. Politoscope puts these research tools in the hands of the rest of us.
  • Income Disparity (Shing-Yun Chiang): The average American household earned $57,652 in 2016, but this number does not tell the whole story. Explore the gap between those earning the most and those earning the least across the United States.
  • Making Sense of Skills (Jyldyz Djumalieva and Cath Sleeman): Skill shortages in the work force are costly and can hamper economic growth, but we do not currently measure these shortages in a detailed or timely way. What skills will be in high demand over the next 50 years?

For additional information about each of these visualizations, please visit scimaps.org.

About the Places & Spaces exhibition:

Drawing from across cultures and across scholarly disciplines, Places & Spaces: Mapping Science demonstrates the power of maps to address vital questions about the contours and content of human knowledge. An interdisciplinary and international advisory board chose each one of the works in the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit as an outstanding example of how visualization can bring patterns in scientific data into focus. The exhibit is curated by the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center at Indiana University. The exhibit has been on display at over 382 venues in 28 countries on 6 continents. It showcases the work of 248 mapmakers that hail from 17 different countries. For further information, please visit our website at scimaps.org.